PC Admin

PC Admin

Administrator
Staff member
Dedicated resource for Lenox Hill Hospital located in 100 EAST 77TH STREET - New York, NY. Containing reports of complications, death rates etc. Reviews and real experiences of patients and their loved ones are invited. The treatment and medical care statistics listed below are updated and synced twice a year as per the 'Medicare Database' via an API.
 
Provider ID
330119
Address
100 EAST 77TH STREET
City
NEW YORK
State
NY
ZIP Code
10021
County
NEW YORK
Phone Number
2124392345
Hospital Type
Acute Care Hospitals
Hospital Ownership
Voluntary non-profit - Private
Emergency Department Volume
very high
Avg time patients spent in emergency dept before seen by a Medical Professional
14 minutes
Patients who left the emergency department before being seen (%)
1%
Median Time to ECG for heart attack/chest pain in Emergency dept
Not Available
Median time to Pain Med in Emergency Dept
59 minutes
Avg time patients spent in Emergency dept before inpatient admission
270 minutes
Overall Hospital Rating
3.00 star(s)
Cleanliness Star Rating
2.00 star(s)
Doctor Communication Star Rating
3.00 star(s)
Nurse Communication Star Rating
3.00 star(s)
Patients who reported that they ALWAYS received help as soon as they wanted (%)
63%
Patients who were unhappy with treatment
10%
Avg Death Rate For Heart Attack Patients (%)
13.1%
Death Rate For Heart Attack Patients National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Avg Death Rate For Heart Failure Patients (%)
9.2%
Death Rate For Heart Failure Patients Comparison
Significantly better than National Rate
Avg Death Rate For CABG Surgery Patients (%)
2.2%
Death Rate For CABG Surgery Patients Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Avg Death Rate For Stroke Patients (%)
12.3%
Death Rate For Stroke Patients Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Avg Death Rate For COPD Patients (%)
8.3%
Death Rate For COPD Patients National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Avg Death Rate For Pneumonia Patients (%)
13%
Death Rate For Pneumonia Patients Comparison
Better than the National Rate
Avg Complication Rate For Hip/Knee Replacement Patients (%)
2.6%
Complication Rate for Hip/Knee Replacement National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Postoperative Respiratory Failure Rate Per 1000 Persons
5.84
Postoperative Respiratory Failure Rate National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Postoperative Acute Kidney Injury Requiring Dialysis National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Serious Blood Clots After Surgery Per 1000 Persons
5.77
Serious Blood Clots After Surgery National Comparison
Significantly worse than the National Rate
Blood Stream Infection After Surgery Per 1000 Persons
5.94
Blood Stream Infection After Surgery National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Split Wound After Surgery on The Abdomen or Pelvis Per 1000 Persons
0.99
Split Wound After Surgery on The Abdomen or Pelvis National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Accidental Cuts and Tears From Medical Treatment Per 1000 Persons
1.63
Accidental Cuts and Tears From Medical Treatment National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Bedsores or Pressure Ulcers Per 1000 Persons
1.09
Bedsores or Pressure Ulcers Rate National Comparison
Significantly worse than the National Rate
Deaths Among Patients With Serious Treatable Complications After Surgery Per 1000 persons
123.58
Deaths Among Patients With Serious Treatable Complications After Surgery Comparison
Significantly better than the National Rate
Collapsed Lung Due To Medical Treatment Per 1000 Persons
0.31
Collapsed Lung Due To Medical Treatment National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Perioperative Hemorrhage or Hematoma Rate Per 1000 Persons
3.51
Perioperative Hemorrhage or Hematoma Rate National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Surgical Site Infections With Colon Surgery National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Surgical Site Infections With Abdominal Hysterectomy
No Different than the National Rate
Rate of Unplanned Hospital Visits After Colonoscopy National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Heart Attack 30-Day Readmission Rate National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Heart Failure 30-Day Readmission Rate National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Rate of Readmission For Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Rate of Readmission For Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Rate of Readmission For Stroke Patients National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Pneumonia 30-Day Readmission Rate National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Rate of Readmission After Hip/Knee Replacement National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Overall Unplanned Readmission Rate
No Different than the National Rate
Average Cost For Heart Attack Patients Comparison
Significantly greater than the National Average
Average Cost For Heart Failure Patients Comparison
Significantly greater than the National Average
Average Cost For Hip/Knee Replacement Comparison
No Different than the National Average
Average Cost For Pneumonia Patients Comparison
Significantly greater than the National Average
bucolic

bucolic

New Member
When you have the best physicians taking care of you, there’s literally nothing else you can hope for in a hospital. I cannot tell you how happy I was with the service I received from two specific doctors, Dr. Shenoy and Dr. Schneider, the two best physicians to have ever walked the floors of Lenox.

As someone who had been coming to Lenox since I was 9, I can say with confidence that the service around here has changed. Interns, residents, nursing students, nurses, and attendings have come and gone, but one thing I know for certain is that the doctors work their butts off just to see their patients smile for another day. Me in particular, because I’d been diagnosed at an early age, I became familiar with Dr. Schneider first, and then Dr. Shenoy and they both are literally the warmest human beings you will ever meet.

Dr. Schneider was always cracking me up, trying to distract me from my ailment and bringing toys from home, saying it belonged to his daughter when she was young. His was the only face I looked forward to seeing throughout the day, that’s right, not even my mother’s face provided me with that level of comfort.

Dr. Shenoy, on the other hand, is very bright and is very well mannered. He does an excellent job at calming down family members and explaining to them in detail about the condition and what needs to be done to combat it. If you sit down and have a chat with him, you won’t even realize how charming and smooth he is.
 
L

luis

New Member
There’s no better Emergency Room in New York than at Lenox, and no, this is not an exaggeration. As someone who has a weird liver condition and is anemic, I have been taken in by paramedics to 3 different hospitals already (won’t wish to name each one), but the fact is that the last time I was rushed to Lenox, and have decided I’ll only come here from now on.
 
dodo

dodo

New Member
This was a very scary time for my family and I. Our 5-year-old daughter had to be rushed to the ICU and she was there for 3 whole days. After this, she was moved to a regular ward. The time spent in the ICU was decent. There was no disturbance, it was very quiet and quite professional. My partner and I took turns staying with her while the other went to work and found it to be clean, fairly neat and well populated with medical staff in case of emergencies. But when she was shifted to a regular room, that’s when the problems started.

First of all, even though we asked for it, we didn’t get a separate room. They said the rooms were all occupied, so she had to stay with a sick roommate for over 5 days. Also, the rooms were not cleaned on a daily basis and there was medical trash lying around on the floor on the weekend which was NOT a pretty sight. The trash cans were not emptied for 2 days and the restrooms are not cleaned on a daily basis.

The nurses at the ER were competent but at the wards, they are sort of useless (pardon the crude language).
But they were making jokes and on their phones 90% of the time. It got so annoying to a point where my partner had to yell at them, asking them not to be so noisy around our poor daughter who always seemed to wake up from a peaceful night’s sleep because of them.

Thankfully, she was able to fully recover after 2 weeks but I made it a point to talk to the management team of Lenox hospital just to let them know that we were NOT impressed by their service. The least one can expect at a hospital is some level of compassion and consideration for the sick.
 
F

fx

New Member
The first time I came to Lenox, it was for my mother and she was taken care of in a very well manner. The medical staff had befriended her in no time and would often include me in their inside jokes. Apart from this, the doctors were also highly efficient and skilled- genuinely cared about their parents. Thanks, Lenox.
 
candygirl

candygirl

New Member
Day and night the doctors and nurses struggle to tend to their patients and keep them alive. What most people don’t realize is just how much effort goes into this. So as an intern, let me just tell you that if they seem cranky once in a while, it’s because they are on 20-30 hour shifts together, and on their feet constantly. If you think that the interns are not doing good-enough jobs, cut us some slack, we are still new to this, but promise that we will learn with time and experience. A shout-out to all the nurses, by the way- who are very supportive and nice to all the new-bees.
 
J

jayson

New Member
While writing this review, I struggled a lot thinking about whether to give it a good rating or a bad rating. The truth is that I went to Lenox hospital as a sick patient but left there having fully recovered, so that’s a good thing. Additionally, I really liked the service of the nursing staff at Lenox, especially in my ward because they kept checking up on me.

Having said that, though, I feel like there is a lot about this facility that needs upgrading. Somehow, it feels like it’s been forever since the last time they got new sheets for the beds. Additionally, the neurology department at Lenox is the biggest joke of all, mostly because the so-called physicians and neurosurgeons are the least compassionate people I’ve met in my life—and I’m a cop who works with criminals.

I came here for reasons I don’t wish to disclose but had to get consulted by the neurology team. My overall experience (minus the nurses) was God awful. The prognosis about my condition was made but everything about my medication was not specified to me. In fact, they made some last-minute changes that even I was unaware of and was horrified to have studied that later on. It felt more like a mental institution where I was being medicated against my will.

Even worse than this was when I had a resident come up to me and ask me if he could use my case for his thesis because it was “interesting”. Note that at that point, I was still dealing with hearing about the condition. This was the worst experience I’ve ever had in a hospital, granted that I haven’t had many encounters in a hospital, but still. Absolutely no compassion or kindness amongst the circle of doctors.

What can be done to improve? I have an idea: I think that doctors, physicians, residents, interns, etc. should shadow nurses for a while in order to imbibe the quality of compassion in them. Lord knows that being a doctor requires you to be considerate about your patient, especially if they are diagnosed with a rare condition. Otherwise, turn towards research. Your job demands you to meet with people every day, which means the FIRST quality you need is people skills.
 
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