PC Admin

PC Admin

Administrator
Staff member
Dedicated resource for Emory University Hospital located in 1364 CLIFTON ROAD, NE - Atlanta, GA. Containing reports of complications, death rates etc. Reviews and real experiences of patients and their loved ones are invited. The treatment and medical care statistics listed below are updated and synced twice a year as per the 'Medicare Database' via an API.
 
Provider ID
110010
Address
1364 CLIFTON ROAD, NE
City
ATLANTA
State
GA
ZIP Code
30322
County
DE KALB
Phone Number
4046868500
Hospital Type
Acute Care Hospitals
Hospital Ownership
Voluntary non-profit - Private
Emergency Department Volume
high
Avg time patients spent in emergency dept before seen by a Medical Professional
19 minutes
Patients who left the emergency department before being seen (%)
5%
Median Time to ECG for heart attack/chest pain in Emergency dept
Not Available
Median time to Pain Med in Emergency Dept
66 minutes
Avg time patients spent in Emergency dept before inpatient admission
484 minutes
Overall Hospital Rating
5.00 star(s)
Cleanliness Star Rating
3.00 star(s)
Doctor Communication Star Rating
4.00 star(s)
Nurse Communication Star Rating
3.00 star(s)
Patients who reported that they ALWAYS received help as soon as they wanted (%)
65%
Patients who were unhappy with treatment
4%
Avg Death Rate For Heart Attack Patients (%)
11.7%
Death Rate For Heart Attack Patients National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Avg Death Rate For Heart Failure Patients (%)
9.7%
Death Rate For Heart Failure Patients Comparison
No different than the National Rate
Avg Death Rate For CABG Surgery Patients (%)
2.4%
Death Rate For CABG Surgery Patients Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Avg Death Rate For Stroke Patients (%)
15.1%
Death Rate For Stroke Patients Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Avg Death Rate For COPD Patients (%)
7.6%
Death Rate For COPD Patients National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Avg Death Rate For Pneumonia Patients (%)
13.7%
Death Rate For Pneumonia Patients Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Avg Complication Rate For Hip/Knee Replacement Patients (%)
1.9%
Complication Rate for Hip/Knee Replacement National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Postoperative Respiratory Failure Rate Per 1000 Persons
5.63
Postoperative Respiratory Failure Rate National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Postoperative Acute Kidney Injury Requiring Dialysis National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Serious Blood Clots After Surgery Per 1000 Persons
4.67
Serious Blood Clots After Surgery National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Blood Stream Infection After Surgery Per 1000 Persons
5.89
Blood Stream Infection After Surgery National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Split Wound After Surgery on The Abdomen or Pelvis Per 1000 Persons
0.44
Split Wound After Surgery on The Abdomen or Pelvis National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Accidental Cuts and Tears From Medical Treatment Per 1000 Persons
0.92
Accidental Cuts and Tears From Medical Treatment National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Bedsores or Pressure Ulcers Per 1000 Persons
1.13
Bedsores or Pressure Ulcers Rate National Comparison
Significantly worse than the National Rate
Deaths Among Patients With Serious Treatable Complications After Surgery Per 1000 persons
131.92
Deaths Among Patients With Serious Treatable Complications After Surgery Comparison
Significantly better than the National Rate
Collapsed Lung Due To Medical Treatment Per 1000 Persons
0.31
Collapsed Lung Due To Medical Treatment National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Perioperative Hemorrhage or Hematoma Rate Per 1000 Persons
2.71
Perioperative Hemorrhage or Hematoma Rate National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Surgical Site Infections With Colon Surgery National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Surgical Site Infections With Abdominal Hysterectomy
No Different than the National Rate
Heart Attack 30-Day Readmission Rate National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Heart Failure 30-Day Readmission Rate National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Rate of Readmission For Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Rate of Readmission For Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Rate of Readmission For Stroke Patients National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Pneumonia 30-Day Readmission Rate National Comparison
No Different than the National Rate
Rate of Readmission After Hip/Knee Replacement National Comparison
Significantly better than the National Rate
Overall Unplanned Readmission Rate
No Different than the National Rate
Average Cost For Heart Attack Patients Comparison
No Different than the National Average
Average Cost For Heart Failure Patients Comparison
No Different than the National Average
Average Cost For Hip/Knee Replacement Comparison
Significantly lesser than the National Average
Average Cost For Pneumonia Patients Comparison
Significantly greater than the National Average
barrett

barrett

New Member
I had heard from a friend’s friend that Emory had a reputation of being cold, but when I got my dream job last year that had Emory under its panel for medical insurance, I figured what’s the harm. Plus, all doctors in one institution does sound pretty convenient. It was right near work and took my insurance, so it was literally like I’d hit the jackpot. Or so I thought..

I remember making a call to Emory to book an appointment for my father when he first suspected he had cancer (which by the way, he did- 2nd stage). The receptionist who picked up wasn’t particularly rude, but she asked him if he’d been diagnosed. When I told her that he wasn’t 100% certain, she asked me to call them and book an appointment when cancer had been diagnosed by a medical professional and hung up without waiting for a response. I was shocked. But then I read up on Emory and got to know that the team of doctors were actually very efficient, so didn’t let one bad receptionist ruin my perception about them. But needless to say, my father did not want to get admitted there.

When I had booked an appointment with my general physician, I asked him to refer an allergy doctor to me as I got constant boils all over my body- sometimes my head, arms, armpits, and even genitals. He gave me a confused look and said “first try these medications. I cannot directly recommend a specialist” to which I was confused. They can’t? But anyway, I listened to him and took the medication. It worked to a certain point until I had to travel to my wife’s native home, Mexico. This is where things started going downhill.

The boils started getting bigger and they hurt when I touched them. I called Emory and explained to them my plight. They asked me to come in as soon as I got back to the country, but I said I couldn’t for the next couple of days at least. I asked them what I could do to relieve the pain or some medication I could take. They literally said “we cannot do that until we see you.” I WAS SHOCKED. Doesn’t the doctor know what my condition is and at least give me certain tips on what to stay away from, whether I can use an ice pack to relieve the pain? I decided that as soon as I came back to the country I’d change hospitals and that was exactly what I did. Emory has no compassion for patients in pain.
 
D

Disegnia

New Member
I know no one will believe me when I say this but the cafeteria food is edible (LOL)
 
R

roger67

New Member
Came to visit my sister who had been an inpatient for 3 days at the Emory Hospital. I don’t generally like making hospital visits because I’m a bit of a neat freak. But Emory was not as bad as I was expecting. Nice staff.
 
SpiceMan68

SpiceMan68

New Member
After my wife got admitted into Emory was when I could breath again, literally. She had been vomiting blood for a few weeks and many doctors that we’d consulted always asked her to take medical tests, but always said it was probably food poisoning. But it wasn’t and then I’d have to take her to another hospital.

Emory took only 18 hours to figure out the issue and start her on medication immediately. It was a tough time for the both of us, but the whole team was so supportive. Not just for her, but for me. Sometimes you just need someone to tell you that everything is going to work out. The nurses and our assigned physician were all very nice.
I can say with conviction that if I were ever to get a medical procedure done, I wouldn’t think twice before admitting myself into Emory.
 
blaInE

blaInE

New Member
I wish I had some better news, but my experience at Emory was like a nightmare. They charge you for EVERYTHING, for every single cup I feel and if it was worth the service, I wouldn’t even mind. Besides, after my visit, I realized that they overcharged us, almost twice as much for every single procedure and doctor visit. I would say: stay away from Emory because there are much better hospitals in Atlanta.
 
K

kassidy

New Member
This patient was saved by the grace of God alone, no doubt about that. I’ve been working at Emory as a nurse for over 3 years now and it’s been rewarding. But on this particular day, I knew that I was sent to room emergency room for a reason. After all, God works in the most mysterious of ways.

We had to tend to a child who was shot in the face. It was the most brutal attack you’d ever seen on a child that young. I wasn’t used to working in the Emergency Room but that day, even after my shift I was staying back, talking with my colleagues when the kid was rushed in. They asked for extra sets of hands and I rushed in without a second thought.

While the team operated on the child, my heart sent out a silent prayer to God. Instantly when I opened my eyes, it was as though the team of doctors had become a band of angels. What can I say, the child survived and was shifted to a room in 2 days. It was a miracle I was not expecting but was very pleased with.
 
G

Giuliana

New Member
This is one of those hospitals where I had zero respect for the medical staff working with sick patients day in and day out (which is normally at 100%). Maybe that’s because the compassion I usually have for them is reflected by their compassion towards the patients. That’s right, NO compassion whatsoever to the sick.

I was literally in the waiting area and I saw this man come in with puffy, red eyes and a bluish face, saying he couldn’t breathe.
You’d think the head nurse would be more concerned for him, but she literally asked him if he had someone with him to fill out a form. Honestly, I feel like nothing in this hospital is conducted in a timely fashion.

I recall being asked to run around for my husband’s X-ray for a broken femur, and it took more than 15 hours. Honestly I don’t know how else to express my pain any further except through this review and a long email to the management team of Emory. Hopefully it’ll do some good.
 
C

cheyenne

New Member
The doctors at Emory are top-notch in their fields of specialization and do an excellent job in communication with the patient (which for a patient is everything).
 
shaun

shaun

New Member
I came to Atlanta for a few weeks on business and had to be taken into the ER for an acute asthma attack. The EMT took me to Emory and I’d never been. Although I vaguely remember my friend telling me that Emory had some good doctors, I decided to roll with it anyway.
Though the place seemed a little disorganized; there was a patient strolling down the aisle aimlessly without any aid and a nurse was shouting at the janitor, but I got the care I needed almost instantly. So no complaints from my side as such, but I think the bathrooms need to be a little cleaner.
 
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